"What’s this?" Jane asked, her eyes lighting up. She picked up the grapefruit-size orb and stared at it intensely, then laughed with delight as it began to emit a soft, golden glow.

"Do you truly not recognize it?" Thor asked with a smile. Her eyes narrowed, playfully suspicious, and he chuckled. Jane Foster was magnificently fierce! "In Midgard, you would call this a ‘lightbulb.’" Jane dropped the globe in surprise. Thor caught it deftly and replaced it on its stand, and offered Jane his arm. "Shall we continue? I’m sure there are many other things you’d like to see." She smiled ruefully and walked on her own alongside him.

Oh, what a wonderful woman she was! Fierce as Sif, kind as Frigga, and more wise (if that were possible - Thor didn’t want to think about it too much) than even his father, in some ways. Jane was perfect, flitting about with all of the Midgardians’ usual speed. It was fate which had brought them together, the greatest fate in the Nine Realms.

A crash echoed off the columns in the hall ahead. Jane reached absently for Thor, who took her hand gently and drew her to a stop. “Stay here,” he said. “I am sure it is nothing, but I will take a look to make sure of it. I do not want you to be injured, Jane Foster.”

Before he could investigate, though, the source of the noise became apparent. Loki sauntered around one of the near columns, a lazy grin on his face, looking for all the world like the king of all cats.

"Ah, brother!" he cried. "How marvelous! I had hoped to find you - there’s someone I’d like you to meet!" His eyes darted to Jane, who Thor was surprised to see was just behind him, glaring. "Ms Foster, it is a pleasure." Jane said nothing, merely stared coldly at the man who had tried so hard to destroy her world.

Loki shrugged.

"As you will." He gestured, and a tall, slender young woman walked from behind the column to join him. Her eyes were brown and wide, but there was no fear in them. Thor’s own eyes narrowed.

"What is the meaning of this, Loki? You know Father’s edicts regarding Midgardians in Asgard." Loki raised an eyebrow and glanced significantly at Jane, whose glare grew even frostier. After a moment, Loki took the woman’s hand and led her forward.

"Brother, it is my distinct pleasure to present Queen Susan Pevensie, the Gentle, of Narnia, by way of London." Loki gave a flourishing bow, and Susan courtsied deeply, perfectly, easily, as though she’d been raised in the courts of Asgard.

"My lady," Thor replied with a less elaborate bow. "I am Thor, son of Odin, King of Asgard."

"Please, call me Susan," she said. Her voice was full and rich and low, and there was something musical in it, and something which said with certainty that Thor was an equal to her. She must be a powerful woman in this… Narnia, Loki had called it?

"I will ask you again, brother. Why is she here?" Susan looked to Loki with something like hope in her eyes. Thor had an inkling of things then, a moment of particular clarity. "Have you told her you love her?"

"For someone as stereotypically heroic as you, Thor, you are woefully unromantic," Loki replied. "And no, I have told her no such thing. One cannot love without trust, and the Lady Susan and I have just met." His voice lowered to a loud whisper. "You see, brother, I have told her all about you, and about Jane Foster. She is eager to see someone from her world - it seems she’s been hidden in a lion’s tower for decades!" Susan smiled cautiously at Jane, who nodded and smiled back.

"More importantly, though, brother, I wanted to prove to your father that you were not the only royal son who could attract a Midgardian girl with a plain name. Queen Susan is my guest, at the moment, and I hope that one day, she will agree to be my bride. We will be Loki and Susan, and Thor and Jane. Plain and grand, all in one. Asgard’s princes should have nothing but the best, and these two have succeeded in their lives despite their unremarkable names." The tomcat grin was back on Loki’s face.

Jane and Susan’s faces were perfectly blank. Jane’s eyes blazed like an inferno, though, and Susan’s had become twin frozen lakes. The two women looked at each other and, though they said nothing, they clearly were of one mind. Jane looked up at Thor expectantly.

Mjolnir hung from his belt, as always. It was a simple matter, really, and everything happened all at once. In one motion, he closed the distance between himself and his brother and swept upward with the great hammer. It took Loki under the chin. Thor watched as his brother sailed through the air and came to a crashing halt against one of the huge stone columns lining the hall. Only those who were worthy could wield the enchanted hammer, but Mjolnir had seemed to act on its own in striking Loki for his remark. Thor shook his head and replaced it on his belt.

He turned to Susan, whose face was now open disbelief. “I did not mean to frighten you, my lady,” he said sheepishly. Loki was not stirring. “I will leave you to your own counsel as regards my brother, my lady, but I will also caution you that Loki is only ever interested in Loki. Anyone else is a pawn in his schemes.”

"Thank you for your consideration," Susan replied. "I… I must go to him now. He will need assistance." Jane started toward her, but Susan waved her away.

"If you will be in the city for a few days, we should arrange a meeting," Jane said instead. "I’d be glad to have some normal company for a change." Susan smiled in reply.

"It would be my pleasure. Thank you, miss."

"Please. Call me Jane."

"Thank you, Jane." Jane hadn’t spent her life at any type of court and had only education from movies for it, but she gave a teetering little curtsy before she turned back to Thor. "Let’s continue, then, shall we? I’m sure there are more than just lightbulbs waiting to be discovered." They walked down the hall, arm in arm, together.

Susan turned from watching them to looking at Loki, huddled on the floor where he’d landed. Her suspicions were growing stronger by the minute. What had she gotten herself into? Who was Loki, truly?

Anything, though, would be better than the chains in which Aslan had placed her. She padded softly across the hall to Loki and cradled his head in her lap. “Wake soon, sir,” she said softly. “There is much to see here, and you will show it all to me.”

falnfenix

becausebirds:

Have you seen a Toco Toucan hop down stairs lately? Or a Keel-billed Toucan bathe with a glass of restaurant water?

Toucans are so great! The best part: that huge schnoz of theirs? It’s made of a hollow honeycomb-type structure and is incredibly light weight! Their diet is primarily fruit-based, and there is nothing they love more than to chow down on some grapes or other fruits. The downside of this is their poop is almost 100% liquid (heads up). They are very active and their characteristic hop is nearly as endearing as their large beak - however, they’re much more intensive to care for even than other parrots, and so they’re not great pets.

Toucan Sam of cereal fame is based on a Toco toucan.

Hmmmm should I post more Susan/Loki? Or maybe I should get around to finishing that Arya/Jaqen fic, Snares.

Maybe one of y’all feels charitable and could turn the chicken-kick gif into a the fandom kicks D&D gif, a la that one of Jaime and Bran that’s floating around today (I would, but I don’t have Imageready or a similar gifmaker).

I think I’ll post more Susan/Loki (I just had this crazy idea - might work better as a comic - where Thor is being all chivalrous and showing Jane around Asgard and Loki appears next to him with an extremely bewildered Susan “Brother, you are not the only Asgardian who can woo a Midgard woman with a plain name!” and even though they’re complete strangers, Jane and Susan exchange Looks and Thor casually applies Mjolnir to Loki’s face and he and Jane continue on their way, and Susan isn’t sure if she’s grateful or mortified and has to decide whether to help Loki back to his feet).

You are super welcome.

D&D CONSTANTLY FIND NEW WAYS TO PUT SEX (read: objectified women, sexualized violence, and every boob in the realm) ON SCREEN FOR YOU IN EVERY CREATIVE WAY THRY CAN POSSIBLY IMAGINE and yet we get no sexy naked Oberyn, no naked Loras and Renly, almost no naked Robb, Jon, or Jaime, and (in case you had forgotten - I hadn’t)

NO BATH SCENE IN HARRENHAL AND SO NO OPPORTUNITY FOR TOM “MY NAME IS GERMAN FOR SEXY BEAST” WLASCHIHA TO BE EVEN SHIRTLESS OR SOMETHING

"we can’t possibly fit everything from the books into the show"

well maybe if you spent more time putting stuff from the books on-screen and less time filling the screen with pointless boobs and enticements for Podrick’s Wonderpeen, we could get more of the stuff we all want to see.

condemned-enigma

jenndoesnotcare:

“My little boy David loves watching the Fantastic Four films, he especially loves Chris Evans and spends a lot of time playing at being Johnny Storm. (…) He’s got his walls covered with Johnny Storm pictures too and he knows all the lines. We were recently staying with my best friend Tom who lives in Manchester, England and found out that Chris Evans was coming to town. David was disappointed to find that we’d have already left before the film crew arrived so he sat down and made a card with some pictures for Chris Evans and wrote him a little note. (…) I wish I’d scanned it but I never thought. On the front he did a little picture of Johnny Storm flying across the sky and inside another picture of a scene from the first movie with some speech bubbles and he wrote a little note to Chris saying he was his favourite actor. His ‘uncle’ Tom promised he’d try to get it to Chris Evans for him.

Tom took the card to the film site but security was so tight that he couldn’t get near anyone so he left the card with a note saying who it was from and that he was sorry not to get to take a photo for David’s birthday which was soon. The security guy told him to write down his address and he’d try to find someone to pass it to but made no promises as everything was crazy. That was on Friday 24th Sept. The following morning Tom received a special ‘next day delivery’ from Chris Evans! In it was a brilliant photo of Chris holding up David’s little card, a birthday card with a message from Chris Evans, he’d also signed two BluRay DVD covers with a little message on each for David. On one it said ‘FLAME ON!’ and was signed and on the other it said ‘DREAM BIG, BUDDY’ and was also signed.” 
(x)

Oh man this is cute

whoops it reblogged itself

beximilian
beximilian:

fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Jaime/Cersei Rape Scene in Episode 4.3 of Game of Thrones

"I wonder, then, if the rape was on some level a misguided attempt to give Cersei even more pathos, a la the convenient backstory rapes that have become depressingly common on prestige TV (and Scandal)…I wonder if TV Thrones‘s writers just have a tendency to change problematic book sex scenes into clear scenes of unconsensual sex.” - Hillary Busis, Entertainment Weekly


“Game of Thrones has a rape problem.” - Kevin Spak, Newser


"In the original depiction, Jaime never says “Why have the Gods made me love a hateful woman?” — a line that the TV show added in, which in context makes Jaime look like an abusive rapist (the gods made me do it!)”- Darren Franich, Entertainment Weekly


Jaime forced himself upon Cersei despite her demands to stop. “It’s not right,” she cried, to which Jaime snarled, “I don’t care.”…we can never unsee that godawful scene. - Leanne Aguilera, E! Online


"If this scene really just is a miscalculation in direction (and potentially the writing of Benioff and Weiss, neither of whom have yet commented on it) and doesn’t get any payoff later in the season, then it truly deserves all the criticism it has been receiving.” - Terri Schwartz, Zap2It


The director who shot the scene and the man who acted in it both believe it wasn’t necessarily nonconsensual sex— an attitude that isn’t totally surprising in a society that’s deeply confused about what constitutes consent, and that doesn’t always recognize sexual violence for what it is. -Tara Culp-Ressler, ThinkProgress


So then Jaime … well … no other way to put this, really. He rapes his sister beside their corpse of their murdered son. This is the same guy who protected Brienne from a similar fate last year.  - James Hibberd, Entertainment Weekly


"…the show’s overall treatment of women as disposable objects onto whom physical and emotional violence are relentlessly enacted. Sexual violence is so pervasive on the show that nearly every woman on the show has been raped or threatened with rape. The show, and the books, reveal the disturbing and cavalier facility with which rape becomes a narrative device.Rape is used to punish. Rape is used to make a woman more sympathetic or to explicate their anger or other unlikable qualities. Rape is used to put women in their place.” -Roxane Gay, Salon


"The entire scene in the sept was an exercise in Cersei’s belittlement. She watched her father degrade and dishonor (albeit truthfully) her firstborn’s legacy and then manipulate her youngest into serving as his marionette. Then, on the floor next to the body of her dead son, the only man she’s ever taken into her confidence abused that trust in the most vile way imaginable.” - Hillary Kelly, The New Republic


"A giggling dead body would have at least taken our attention away from, you know, the raping." - Johnny Brayson, wetpaint


"Whether the show meant it to come across that way or not, what we saw was a rape.” - Erik Kain, Forbes


"The scene, which has Cersei pleading “stop it” repeatedly and struggling against Jaime, appears far from consensual." - Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times


In the show there’s no other way to interpret it as unambiguous rape. Jaimie isn’t loving when he tries to have sex with her in the show, he’s shown as being angry and hateful, cursing her for being a wicked woman. There’s no point in the scene on the show that we can see Cersei consent, which makes the whole scene significantly different from the book. Some readers have pointed out that the rape in the show is damaging for Cersei’s character arc since she had to endure the marriage to Robert Baratheon in which he essentially engaged in marital rape,  Her consensual sex was always with Jaimie who made her feel safe. Jaimie raping her in the show completely destroys their relationship and destroys the trust she has in Jaimie leaving her without anyone. - AJ, the Digital Times


The rewritten scene also takes away all of Cersei’s agency. In the original text, Cersei chooses to have sex with Jaime, grotesque as it and the setting may be — because she wants to, or because she uses sex to manipulate, it doesn’t matter. Cersei has power and control. The scene in the show deprives her of all of that. - Amelia McDonell-Parry, The Frisky


His response is not to stop loving her, not to stop believing that he is victim to the gods. Instead, Jaime rapes his sister, passing that sense of unendurable pain on to her. He must know that this is the worst possible way that he could hurt her. Jaime knew that Robert raped Cersei, and in the novels, he wanted to kill Robert for it. Not only does raping Cersei remind his sister of her repeated, humiliating violation, Jaime is poisoning their own relationship, the thing that had been Cersei’s antidote to the miseries of her marriage. It is an exceptionally cruel thing for Jaime to do.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Washington Post.


It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. - Sonia Saraiya, AV Club


If Graves intended to depict consensual sex in the end, he completely failed. This wasn’t even one of those terribly clichéd scenes where a man starts raping a woman only to find that she comes around to thinking it’s hot. Cersei is still kicking and protesting when the camera cuts away. It’s as straightforward a rape scene as you’ll get on TV, unless you buy the ridiculous myth that a woman can’t be raped if she’s consented to sex with a man before. - Amanda Marcotte, Slate


This isn’t the first rape scene in Game of Thrones—far from it. And there’s been controversy over the show’s use of rape before. But what makes this scene the most upsetting one yet is that the director didn’t realize he was filming a rape scene…Whether or not the creators intended this to be a rape scene is irrelevant; they made one anyway. And worse, they made one that encourages the most dangerous thinking about rape imaginable. - Laura Hudson, Wired


"How will victims of sexual assault be affected when a director and actor in one of television’s most popular shows questions whether no really means no?" - Eliana Dockterman, Time Magazine


I’ll go ahead and say it: Jaime Lannister has become a rape cliché. He’s the boss, like every other on-screen rapist we’ve ever seen. - Hayley Krischer, Salon


"I’m not opposed to shows depicting sexual violence, but rape-as-prop is always distressing…Rape and abuse have consequences for the victims who carry those traumas with them. While I don’t know exactly how the show will depict the aftermath of Jamie raping Cersei, GoT does not have a strong track record of acknowledging or exploring the lingering effects of surviving sexual assault." - Margarey Lyons, Vulture/New York Magazine


"I can’t think of any comparable defense for the rape scene in "Breaker of Chains," which feels like a naked and ill-conceived attempt to push Game of Thrones into even darker territory. …I’m concerned that Game of Thrones has made a mistake it can’t take back — and one that sets a troubling precedent for the show’s future.” - Scott Meslow, The Week


The Game of Thrones Rape Scene Was Unnecessary and Despicable….The fact that showrunners might be asking us to overlook this for the sake of character development is downright insulting and says a lot about how we treat victims, especially the ones who come off as unlikable. - Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com


Is “Game of Thrones” Obsessed With Sexual Assault?…Frankly, there are some weeks when “Game of Thrones” doesn’t seem worth the effort.  - Sam Adams, IndieWire



If only every professional writer who wrote on this week’s episode could have been as equivocal

beximilian:

fatpinkcast:

Critics’ Reactions to the Jaime/Cersei Rape Scene in Episode 4.3 of Game of Thrones

"I wonder, then, if the rape was on some level a misguided attempt to give Cersei even more pathos, a la the convenient backstory rapes that have become depressingly common on prestige TV (and Scandal)…I wonder if TV Thrones‘s writers just have a tendency to change problematic book sex scenes into clear scenes of unconsensual sex.” - Hillary Busis, Entertainment Weekly

Game of Thrones has a rape problem.” Kevin Spak, Newser

"In the original depiction, Jaime never says “Why have the Gods made me love a hateful woman?” — a line that the TV show added in, which in context makes Jaime look like an abusive rapist (the gods made me do it!)”- Darren Franich, Entertainment Weekly

Jaime forced himself upon Cersei despite her demands to stop. “It’s not right,” she cried, to which Jaime snarled, “I don’t care.”…we can never unsee that godawful scene. Leanne Aguilera, E! Online

"If this scene really just is a miscalculation in direction (and potentially the writing of Benioff and Weiss, neither of whom have yet commented on it) and doesn’t get any payoff later in the season, then it truly deserves all the criticism it has been receiving.” - Terri Schwartz, Zap2It

The director who shot the scene and the man who acted in it both believe it wasn’t necessarily nonconsensual sex— an attitude that isn’t totally surprising in a society that’s deeply confused about what constitutes consent, and that doesn’t always recognize sexual violence for what it is. -Tara Culp-Ressler, ThinkProgress

So then Jaime … well … no other way to put this, really. He rapes his sister beside their corpse of their murdered son. This is the same guy who protected Brienne from a similar fate last year.  - James Hibberd, Entertainment Weekly

"…the show’s overall treatment of women as disposable objects onto whom physical and emotional violence are relentlessly enacted. Sexual violence is so pervasive on the show that nearly every woman on the show has been raped or threatened with rape. The show, and the books, reveal the disturbing and cavalier facility with which rape becomes a narrative device.Rape is used to punish. Rape is used to make a woman more sympathetic or to explicate their anger or other unlikable qualities. Rape is used to put women in their place.” -Roxane Gay, Salon

"The entire scene in the sept was an exercise in Cersei’s belittlement. She watched her father degrade and dishonor (albeit truthfully) her firstborn’s legacy and then manipulate her youngest into serving as his marionette. Then, on the floor next to the body of her dead son, the only man she’s ever taken into her confidence abused that trust in the most vile way imaginable.” - Hillary Kelly, The New Republic

"A giggling dead body would have at least taken our attention away from, you know, the raping." - Johnny Brayson, wetpaint

"Whether the show meant it to come across that way or not, what we saw was a rape.” - Erik Kain, Forbes

"The scene, which has Cersei pleading “stop it” repeatedly and struggling against Jaime, appears far from consensual." - Margaret Wappler, Los Angeles Times

In the show there’s no other way to interpret it as unambiguous rape. Jaimie isn’t loving when he tries to have sex with her in the show, he’s shown as being angry and hateful, cursing her for being a wicked woman. There’s no point in the scene on the show that we can see Cersei consent, which makes the whole scene significantly different from the book. Some readers have pointed out that the rape in the show is damaging for Cersei’s character arc since she had to endure the marriage to Robert Baratheon in which he essentially engaged in marital rape,  Her consensual sex was always with Jaimie who made her feel safe. Jaimie raping her in the show completely destroys their relationship and destroys the trust she has in Jaimie leaving her without anyone. - AJ, the Digital Times

The rewritten scene also takes away all of Cersei’s agency. In the original text, Cersei chooses to have sex with Jaime, grotesque as it and the setting may be — because she wants to, or because she uses sex to manipulate, it doesn’t matter. Cersei has power and control. The scene in the show deprives her of all of that. - Amelia McDonell-Parry, The Frisky

His response is not to stop loving her, not to stop believing that he is victim to the gods. Instead, Jaime rapes his sister, passing that sense of unendurable pain on to her. He must know that this is the worst possible way that he could hurt her. Jaime knew that Robert raped Cersei, and in the novels, he wanted to kill Robert for it. Not only does raping Cersei remind his sister of her repeated, humiliating violation, Jaime is poisoning their own relationship, the thing that had been Cersei’s antidote to the miseries of her marriage. It is an exceptionally cruel thing for Jaime to do.  - Alyssa Rosenberg, Washington Post.

It’s hard to shake the idea that Game Of Thrones, the show, doesn’t see a problem with pushing a scene from complicated, consensual sex to outright rape. It would be easier to accept that idea if it were clear what the show was trying to do with those changes. - Sonia Saraiya, AV Club

If Graves intended to depict consensual sex in the end, he completely failed. This wasn’t even one of those terribly clichéd scenes where a man starts raping a woman only to find that she comes around to thinking it’s hot. Cersei is still kicking and protesting when the camera cuts away. It’s as straightforward a rape scene as you’ll get on TV, unless you buy the ridiculous myth that a woman can’t be raped if she’s consented to sex with a man before. - Amanda Marcotte, Slate

This isn’t the first rape scene in Game of Thrones—far from it. And there’s been controversy over the show’s use of rape before. But what makes this scene the most upsetting one yet is that the director didn’t realize he was filming a rape scene…Whether or not the creators intended this to be a rape scene is irrelevant; they made one anyway. And worse, they made one that encourages the most dangerous thinking about rape imaginable. - Laura Hudson, Wired

"How will victims of sexual assault be affected when a director and actor in one of television’s most popular shows questions whether no really means no?" - Eliana Dockterman, Time Magazine

I’ll go ahead and say it: Jaime Lannister has become a rape cliché. He’s the boss, like every other on-screen rapist we’ve ever seen. - Hayley Krischer, Salon

"I’m not opposed to shows depicting sexual violence, but rape-as-prop is always distressing…Rape and abuse have consequences for the victims who carry those traumas with them. While I don’t know exactly how the show will depict the aftermath of Jamie raping Cersei, GoT does not have a strong track record of acknowledging or exploring the lingering effects of surviving sexual assault." - Margarey Lyons, Vulture/New York Magazine

"I can’t think of any comparable defense for the rape scene in "Breaker of Chains," which feels like a naked and ill-conceived attempt to push Game of Thrones into even darker territory. …I’m concerned that Game of Thrones has made a mistake it can’t take back — and one that sets a troubling precedent for the show’s future.” - Scott Meslow, The Week

The Game of Thrones Rape Scene Was Unnecessary and Despicable….The fact that showrunners might be asking us to overlook this for the sake of character development is downright insulting and says a lot about how we treat victims, especially the ones who come off as unlikable. - Madeleine Davies, Jezebel.com

Is “Game of Thrones” Obsessed With Sexual Assault?…Frankly, there are some weeks when “Game of Thrones” doesn’t seem worth the effort.  - Sam Adams, IndieWire

If only every professional writer who wrote on this week’s episode could have been as equivocal